Lee Hewes

is totes becoming a teacher…

Using @SeeSaw to engage kids and parents alike.

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One of my PDP goals this year was to improve my documentation of non-written, or perhaps more fittingly, non-worksheet based assessment. I spoke to my friend Pip Cleaves about how I’d been using Evernote as part of this process to photograph and annotate student work and how I’d been finding it OK, albeit a bit time consuming. Pip mentioned the SeeSaw app and that Cheryl Roner had been using it over at Hilltop Road Public School and I said I’d consider giving it a go. I also mentioned the app to a parent and he seemed very enthusiastic, asking me about when I was going to get started whenever he saw me. I decided to set it up and I’m very glad that I did. I’ll explain a few reasons why.

From an assessment point of view:

Firstly, assessment is no good unless it is acted upon, which is part of the reason I dislike worksheets so badly. It’s very easy to get kids to complete a worksheet, mark it in their absence, document the sheet for your records and then move on without even saying anything to the student(s) about how they are going and discussing ways in which they can improve.

So how is SeeSaw different?

Well, kids get very excited about sharing their work with their parents. With SeeSaw you can tell them what you are looking for and ask them to go off and demonstrate in order for them to take a photo or video to share with their parents. They typically scurry off excitedly to complete their work, returning to have a discussion about what they have done. This opens up an opportunity for you to either confirm that they are on the right track, or explain to them what needs to be fixed up for them to be able to share their correct understanding with their parents via the app.

It also allows for assessment AS learning, where students can add corrections to their work (or explanations of their work) when sharing with parents. In the example below, one of my students has correctly shown time on the hour, as well as half past, however, when explaining it to her mum using an audio recording, she accidentally says the time is 7:30 rather than 8:00. She was able to assess that with my help and (logged in as me) write an audio comment addressing her mistake.

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.8ca18ae5-7bec-4ba5-b957-8977415393db&share_token=zksB3F4mTUOvj-Ve6xJs9A&mode=embed

From a kids can learn anywhere point of view:

A few weeks ago one of my students was ill and away from work for the day. Whilst away, she wrote the following blog post from home. Yes, I know, it’s very short but she’s in year 1 and she was at home sick , so give her a break!

https://kidblog.org/class/1LMEPS/posts/5krx4ya79k90j3yz5wg89lwy2

She logged into SeeSaw from home using her iPad and urged us to read her post by making some audio comments on a photo I’d posted of the class reading a big book together in the ampitheatre. As I was at assembly at the time, I was able to receive the notification on my phone that she had commented (I thought it was her mum making the comment). I thought her comments were hilarious and cute, so I read through her post with the class and we left a whole class audio comment in reply, explaining that we had read and enjoyed the post, very funny. My student replied from home and we listened to it as a class the next day. So, as you can see below, sickness is no barrier to learning when you can connect with your class from home!

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.fac1e9bf-d67d-44df-8763-17c3270c946d&share_token=lKbv2fYiRD-wQdPlQsy_Gg&mode=embed

From an engaging with parents point of view:

As a parent, I remember the sense of frustration I used to get when asking my kids when they were younger what they did at school during the day. You’d ask the question, “So, what did you get up to at school today?” only to receive a response like, “Nothing.” or “I don’t remember.” SeeSaw is good at removing this frustration for parents, as you can upload examples of what the kids are doing in class, and the parents receive a notification on their mobile device. They are able to see what is happening in your classroom in real time, no matter whether they are at work, at home, or even on the other side of the world. 

Although you cannot view it,, I particularly loved a conversation with a parent that I had in relation to the post below, in which a parent explained how much she enjoyed being able to discuss class activities with her child’s teacher and to see what has been happening in class.

https://app.seesaw.me/pages/shared_item?item_id=item.3bd32d93-df2c-4491-b0e9-a3e46e0ee60e&share_token=cK0tGcQtSA–DhIPlV6Z3g&mode=embed

So, as mentioned at the beginning, I initially intended to be used as a tool for assessment, however, it has become much more than that. It has become a powerful and enjoyable tool for connecting with parents, sharing with them the things we do in class and how wonderful it is to be lucky enough to work as an educator teaching their children.

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One thought on “Using @SeeSaw to engage kids and parents alike.

  1. Pingback: Voices in the Village (2015) | Read Write Respond

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