Lee Hewes

is totes becoming a teacher…

Project Awesome is coming to an end!

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Driving along the Croppa-Moree road yesterday I was thinking about how coming out here for the short time that I have will be an experience I’ll always remember fondly. It really has been epic.

A significant contributor to the epicness has been the fact that I’ve had a supervising teacher who has been very accommodating in terms of allowing me to try stuff, to work through things together and to do a lot of team teaching – to step away from lesson plans and rigidly structured ‘learning’ experiences and to have a go at doing stuff that the kids might be interested in AS WELL as learn from.

A fair amount of the stuff we’ve been doing has been related to Project Awesome which, sadly, is coming to an end.

Last week we sent out parent invitations to a presentation of the students’ work which is set to happen at 2pm tomorrow.

Image

The students have been busily working on their products to show at the presentation and some have now finished. Some have chosen to make artistic representations of their life story, some have chosen to make games, some have chosen to build representations of their life story in Minecraft, film a walkthrough of their Minecraft world and include a voiceover, and others have chosen to make Draw My Life videos.

It has been a bit of a challenge for Michael and I to help the students get through everything in time for the presentation tomorrow. This is partly due to the diversity of the products mentioned above, but also due to the fact that, of course, there are timetabled subjects and other commitments to uphold as part of the regular school day.

In addition to this there have been arrangements outside of the normal school timetable such as cross-country events, NAPLAN, a middle school project at Warialda High School and the ICAS, which have taken time away from classroom teaching.

Looking back at how busy the last few weeks have been, I think it’s actually quite impressive that the students have achieved everything that they have in the time that I’ve been here!

Below is a photo showing how #projectAwesome13 has been very much cross-KLA, and the range of ways in which students have been sharing their life stories.

CrossKLA

On our tally at the end of the day today, we counted that 8 out of the 15 students in the North Star 3, 4, 5 & 6 class had finished their products. This means that we need to help 7 students get through what they need to have finished tomorrow before the presentation at 2pm. LOL!

Two of these students will be finishing their Minecraft projects whilst the other students will be finishing off their Draw My Life videos.

To finish off the project each student will also be contributing a short video response to the DQ explaining what they have created and what they have learned through the project. These responses will be combined with video responses from the Davidson High School students to produce a collaborative video answering the DQ.

As with everything, time is a massive constraint on what you can actually achieve, and in retrospect, this project could have gone over a longer period than the four weeks that I’ve been up here on prac. This is all part of the learning experience however, and overall I’m really happy with how things have happened. It’s been a great intro to PBL and I can’t wait to give it all a go again soon.

I definitely need to sit down at some point and write a post on how things might have been improved and how I might use this experience to help me plan more effectively for future projects, but so as I don’t forget, and to help with that future post, I’ll write down a few things now.

1. Use a project calendar:

I didn’t use a project calendar this time around, and even though it’s most likely impossible to remain 100% on schedule with anything given the business of your average school, I do think having some kind of schedule outlined from the beginning or early stages of the project would have helped.

2. Try to anticipate where hiccoughs may arise, allow time to work through these, allow a little more time on top of this, and then add some more time for the unanticipated:

This is kinda related to the calendar suggestion above, and also to what I have already alluded to regarding time constraints. Michael and I began working with students on this project by my second day here at North Star, and have allowed a project session for nearly every day that I’ve been in the classroom. Even with this much time going to the project, all of us in @northstar3456 have been working very hard to get the project completed on time. Several students have had days away from school for whatever reason, the timetable disruptions mentioned above have taken time away from the project, there have been technology issues of varying descriptions, there have even been days when we have been without a classroom due to repainting! With this in mind, it’s important to try to allow enough time for each project. I’d even go so far as to say allow more time than what you might initially seem as reasonable. You really do never know what’s gonna come up!

With experience I’m sure that these things become easier to anticipate, and there will become fewer and fewer kinks to ‘iron out’ and, as mentioned above, a project calendar should also help – even if only insomuch that it allows you to allow time around some of the pre-scheduled interruptions.

3. Be prepared for a slow start:

Much of the slow work of this project happened at the beginning. Michael and I began planning for this project a long time ago through discussions on Twitter and collaborative planning via Google docs. Also, the beginning of the project in the classroom seemed to take a while to take off, and it wasn’t until half way through my second week of prac that I really felt like things were beginning to kick off. I think this is good, as you are laying the foundations at the beginning for all of the fast-paced and cool stuff which happens later.

4. Use some metaphorical learning spaces:

I’m not sure if that’s what you’re supposed to call them, but I know that Bianca uses spaces and places in the room called the ‘waterhole’, ‘campfire’ and ‘cave’, etc as metaphorical terms for the way students are working. I didn’t use them for this project, but given the collaborative and social nature of much of the project-learning process, as well as the periods of solid, independent working that is involved, I think that having some of these metaphorical ideas around physical and mental learning spaces would definitely be useful.

I think these would come in useful primarily to get students into the right frame of mind for approaching the different stages of each project, and the type of ‘head space’ or approach to working that each stage requires.

Something to implement in future methinks.

5. Go back and revisit the DQ as often as possible:

This is important because I think doing so will help keep all of the project in focus. Doing so, however requires time which, as I’ve said several times already, is a precious commodity.

Of course, there is a heap more that I need to learn and there are sure to be things that I am overlooking at the moment, but I’ll come back to this later when the project is over and I’ve the benefit of a little more time to think about it.

For now though, I would love to share this link to Phenomenal 15 edublog from this afternoon. It shows two of the completed products made by a two of the year 3 students. They both have done really well in getting these finished and I think that both of these are excellent. Can’t wait to see and share the rest when they are all finished!

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One thought on “Project Awesome is coming to an end!

  1. Pingback: My year of edu-awesome. | Lee Hewes

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